Martin calls on all Britons to take advantage of this...

Martin calls on all Britons to take advantage of this...

Summary

'Sabrina Imbler is a generational talent, and this book is a gift to us all.' ED YONG

A prismatic collection of essays from a young queer science writer about some of the ocean's strangest creatures and what they can teach us about human empathy and survival.


As a mixed Chinese and white non-binary writer working in a largely white, male field, science journalist Sabrina Imbler has always been drawn to the mystery of life in the sea, and particularly to creatures living in hostile or remote environments.

Each essay in their debut collection profiles one such creature: the mother octopus who starves herself while watching over her eggs, the Chinese sturgeon whose migration route has been decimated by pollution and dams, the bizarre Bobbitt worm (named after Lorena) and other uncanny creatures lurking in the deep ocean, far below where the light reaches. Fusing genres to create a new kind of essay, Imbler's debut weaves the wonders of marine biology with stories of their own family and coming of age, implicitly connecting endangered sea life to marginalised human communities and asking how they and we adapt, survive and care for each other.

This far-reaching, unique collection shatters our preconceptions about the sea and what it means to survive.

Reviews

  • This is a miraculous, transcendental book. Across these essays, Imbler has choreographed a dance of metaphor between the wonders of the ocean's creatures and the poignancy of human experience, each enriching the other in surprising and profound ways. To write with such grace, skill, and wisdom would be impressive enough; to have done so in their first major work is truly breathtaking. Sabrina Imbler is a generational talent, and this book is a gift to us all.
    ED YONG, New York Times Bestselling author of I Contain Multitudes

About the author

Sabrina Imbler

Sabrina Imbler is a writer and science journalist living in Brooklyn. Their first chapbook, Dyke (geology) was published by Black Lawrence Press, and they have received numerous fellowships and scholarships in the US, including from the Asian American Writers' Workshop and Tin House. Their essays and reporting have appeared in the New York Times, the Atlantic, Catapult, and Sierra, among other publications.
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